Updated: 06/02/2017 05:09 PM | First Published: 02/27/2017 01:49 PM

Mutual beef of French Montana & Max B with Jim Jones created 'Coke Wave' series

French Montana posing with Max B

Following the success of Cocaine City DVD series, French Montana began collaborating with famous rappers including Max B. Various sources claim that Max and he shared common groups of associates. But, due to French’s own issues with Jim Jones, and Max being contracted to his ByrdGang (hip-hop group formed by Jim Jones) at that time, they had yet to work together. Soon, the duo would become one of the most infamous street beef in New York hip-hop. 

French claims that his personal problems with Jones stemmed from his claims that Jones was publicly giving a hint about having a hand with the people responsible for shooting targeting him. In early 2008, Max B abandoned ByrdGang, but his contract with the band restricted him for any commercial release. By then, Jones gathered a streak of feuds with several rappers ranging from Junior MAFIA to Tru Life. 

French’s and Max’s mutual beef with Jones became very public one, resulting in several back-and-forth diss interviews, videos, accusations and confrontations that appeared on street DVDs like Smack, Cocaine City, Sub-0 and Come Up as well as websites like WorldStarHipHop.com and HipHopBeef.com

French and Max B went on to release their first collaborative mixtape entitled Coke Wave in 2009. February of that year would be a busy month for both the artists as they dropped their next solo mixtapes that same month. The Landry Man was French’s 4th release of all but 2nd on his solo career. Similarly, Max also released Quarantine. The rappers concentrated on their solo records until they came up with their 2nd collaboration Coke Wave 2 in November. 

Throughout their stint, the duo would allege being ‘blackballed’ by media and radio also accusing Jim Jones of discouraging labels & websites from covering those rappers. To fight the alleged blackballing, another tactic they used was releasing a flood of mixtapes. Within 2009, they jointly released over a dozen of music. The Coke Wave and his follow-up were accompanied by music videos, in-studio footage, videos revolving around the beef and spoofs.